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Ph.D de

Ph.D
Group : Human-Centered Computing

portability, reuse and transposition: implications the modifications of human operational contexts for software architectures.

Starts on 25/11/2003
Advisor : BEAUDOUIN-LAFON, Michel
[Pr. Michel Beaudouin-Lafon]

Funding : Convention industrielle de formation par la recherche
Affiliation : Université Paris-Saclay
Laboratory : LRI

Defended on 06/10/2008, committee :
Rapporteurs:
Pr. Laurence Nigay
Pr. Philippe Palanque

Examinateur:
Dr. Stéphane Chatty

Encadrant insutriel:
Dr. Célestin Sedogbo

Research activities :
   - Human-Computer Interaction
   - Engineering of Interactive Systems
   - Architecture

Abstract :
The HCI (Human-Computer Interaction) design has become a central point of interest for the software development industry, in particular when it comes to complex information systems development. The goal is not only to match a user interface to specific system functions, but to provide a way to integrate HCI knowledge in the early phase of the software engineering process. This approach takes into account the operational needs of the users and the context of their work environment and organisations. The goals of this work are to provide the user with a better comprehension of the underlying application functionalities of the system and to facilitate the design and development of such systems.

We will present a new design pattern to model and design interactive systems, called MVIC (Model View Interaction and Control), based on the HIC (Human-system Interaction Container) paradigm and inspired from the MVC (Model View Controller) architectural model for user interface design. This new software pattern adopts a functional view of the interaction between the user and the system and provides some separation between the presentation logic, interaction logic and application logic for the complex systems such as the ones encountered in the industry.

Software architects and designers rely on powerful and dedicated software tools to rapidly prototype and develop human-computer interfaces. We give an illustration of the adoption of our approach in a THALES/DCNS software Framework, JAGUAR©. This instance of the interaction modelling approach shows how the functional consideration of the interaction and the integration of the subsequent models allowed the developers to better
acknowledge the user requirements, preferences and operational needs fitted for given information systems capabilities.

Finally, after using MVIC as a structuring pattern for the interactive systems architecture design, integrated to the software development process, we provide a runtime interaction platform, composed of an interaction middleware, interaction containers and interaction components. This approach inspired by the software architecture used for distributed information systems allows to test and deploy a distributed interactive application.

More information: www.lri.fr
Ph.D. dissertations & Faculty habilitations
MICRO VISUALIZATIONS: DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF VISUALIZATIONS FOR SMALL DISPLAY SPACES
The topic of this habilitation is the study of very small data visualizations, micro visualizations, in display contexts that can only dedicate minimal rendering space for data representations. For several years, together with my collaborators, I have been studying human perception, interaction, and analysis with micro visualizations in multiple contexts. In this document I bring together three of my research streams related to micro visualizations: data glyphs, where my joint research focused on studying the perception of small-multiple micro visualizations, word-scale visualizations, where my joint research focused on small visualizations embedded in text-documents, and small mobile data visualizations for smartwatches or fitness trackers. I consider these types of small visualizations together under the umbrella term ``micro visualizations.'' Micro visualizations are useful in multiple visualization contexts and I have been working towards a better understanding of the complexities involved in designing and using micro visualizations. Here, I define the term micro visualization, summarize my own and other past research and design guidelines and outline several design spaces for different types of micro visualizations based on some of the work I was involved in since my PhD.

A NEW GENERATION OF GRAPH NEURAL NETWORKS TO TACKLE AMORPHOUS MATERIALS


SPOTTING NEURAL NETWORK BOTTLENECKS AND FIXING THEM BY ARCHITECTURE GROWTH